Looking On the Bright Side?

I’ve written before that the roofs of our town homes will be replaced in August, and that when our building is being done (it takes eight days) we will need to have all our windows closed — and we have no air conditioning. Today we received notice that the roof demolition and replacement project for our building will begin on August 29.

My due date is August 27.

So the roofing project will take nine days (until September 7), because Labor Day falls within the project time frame and I’m sure no one will work that day. This sucks!!! If I go beyond my due date (and it’s probable), then I might go into labor during this project, and being inside a hot, stuffy building with banging overhead until I’m far enough along to check in at the hospital just sounds awful. When I first read the notice I cried.

However, I’m going to have to suck it up because I’ve no control over this. And for all I know I’ll go into labor sooner, or end up having a scheduled C-section or something. I just wanted to post my protest for posterity.

And on the bright side, this means when my brother visits the 17th-21st, he won’t swelter as he sleeps in the loft.

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12 Comments on “Looking On the Bright Side?”

  1. Liora Says:

    That does sound miserable. Do you have family or friends closeby that you could stay with instead? Also, a backup plan for you and baby sounds like a good idea. Not sure baby would be happy coming home to a hot house and banging.

  2. Kim Says:

    That sounds awful. Can you get a small window unit to run in one room – like the bedroom – just during that time?

  3. Cindy Says:

    I know this may not appeal to you, but might you consider going to something like a nice B&B for a week, maybe not too far from home? Air conditioning? I would imagine you’d like to be in your own home, but if it were nice, you might even see it as a mini-vacation kind of thing.

  4. Karen Says:

    You go girl. Since it can’t get much worse (which it always can!) it’s all bright side

  5. Shirl Says:

    I’d call your landlord immediately Monday morning and just ask if they couldn’t change that work schedule a bit. Explain that baby is due that week. Perhaps they could tweak their schedule. I mean, a 9-months pregnant woman is not someone you want to make uncomfortable!! Good luck, sweetie.

  6. Kate Says:

    That sucks! If you need to escape to somewhere air-conditioned for even an afternoon, give me a buzz and I’ll take you to the air-conditioned place of your choice!

  7. William Sackinger Says:

    Kathryn, sometime in the next four weeks you will be making a transition from a self-reflective mode to a baby-responsive mode. Sleeping in two-hour increments to match your daughter’s habits. It is your opportunity to create the highest art form yet known, the personality of a human being. It is a twenty-year project to do that. I know that you know roughly what you plan to do to make that happen, but, adaptability is necessary along the way. The book I sent you is an additional voice of pragmatic experience distilled from the successes and failures of the past, on baby and child care. It deals with the basic needs, not the finesse of the resulting personality of the child. Good luck with both.

    Bill

  8. Evelyn Says:

    My prayers are with you. We all want a safe comfortable place to welcome our baby. I pray that all works out for your best and that you have a safe, un-eventful delivery of a happy, healthy baby.

    Be well,

    Evelyn

  9. marta Says:

    It is unbelievable that your landlord (lady, whoever) doesn’t get that the timing is awful. But may not be the worst. Maybe–just to be optimistic. Let’s say they begin on time on the 27th and you go into labor a day or so late and then stay in the hospital the usual 3 days (3 in California, right?) then you should have only a day or so of the work going on–if they’re on time but we’re being optimistic here. But also good is the fact that a newborn won’t care at all about anything but being fed and sleeping. You’ll notice, the baby won’t. A few months later and the baby will be totally ticked off about the whole thing.

    Thoughts are with you as always!

  10. Kathryn Says:

    Thanks for all the comforting words. I checked out the suggestion about contacting someone. Here’s the deal. All but a couple of the town homes here are owned, and everyone belongs to the homeowner’s association (except renters). The owners collectively decided to have this job done; this was decided long before we moved in. The real estate manager whom we deal with has no power or involvement; she just collects rent for the owner of our home. I did call the manager of the project (the construction company). He was very polite, and yet said he would not change the order of the work due to the logistics of how the buildings are situated. I understand this; changing one building in so small a complex has a cascade effect on every other building.

    So maybe I’ll get lucky and go into labor between 5 p.m. and 7 a.m., when no work is being done and we can open windows. And maybe the weather will have cooled a bit. It’s only getting to 72 here today.

    Oh, and the hospital stay is 48 hours after the birth for a vaginal delivery, and 96 hours for C-sections.

    One way or other, this kid will arrive. 🙂

  11. Fran aka Redondowriter Says:

    Kathryn, this is really distressing news. My heart fell when I read this post. It is cool down south, too, so let’s hope the coolness works. Do you have some big fans?

    Glad you are in the countdown. I’m so excited for you.

  12. Shirl Says:

    The construction guy is messing seriously with karma by not taking into account a nine-months pregnant woman. *sigh*